Survival Rates for Ovarian Cancer Compared to Other Cancers


Ovarian cancer accounts for approximately three percent of cancers in women. While the 10th most common cancer among women, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and is the deadliest of gynecological cancers. Mortality rates are slightly higher for Caucasian women than for African-American women.

A Woman’s Lifetime Risk:
     A woman’s lifetime risk of developing invasive ovarian cancer is 1 in 72.

A woman’s lifetime risk of dying from invasive ovarian cancer is 1 in 95.

Age:
Approximately 1.2 percent were diagnosed under age 20;

3.6 percent between 20 and 34;

7.4 percent between 35 and 44;

18.6 percent between 45 and 54;

23.4 percent between 55 and 64;

20.1 percent between 65 and 74;

17.6 percent between 75 and 84;

8.1 percent 85+ years of age.

From 2005 to 2009, the median age at diagnosis was 63. For the same period, the median age of death from ovarian cancer was 71.

Survival:

Ovarian cancer survival rates are much lower than other cancers that affect women.

• The relative five-year survival rate is 44 percent. Survival rates vary depending on the stage of diagnosis.

• Women diagnosed at an early stage have a much higher five-year survival rate than those diagnosed at a later stage.

• Approximately 15 percent of ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed early.

• Women diagnosed with breast cancer in 1975 experienced a five-year survival rate of 75.3 percent; today, the American Cancer Society estimates the rate to be 90 percent.

• Women diagnosed with cervical cancer in 1975 experienced a five-year survival rate of 69 percent; today, the American Cancer Society estimates the rate to be 69 percent.

• Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1975 experienced a five-year survival rate of 36 percent; today, the American Cancer Society estimates the rate to be 43 percent.

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